Art Gallery

Newport Street Gallery by Caruso St John by Alex Upton

Newport Street Gallery by London Architecture Studio Caruso St John. All images Copyright © Alex Upton

Newport Street Gallery by London Architecture Studio Caruso St John. All images Copyright © Alex Upton

Development: Newport Street Gallery
Architects: Caruso St John
Location: Newport Street, London

Located in Vauxhall, just a short walk from the Thames River and running parallel to an elevated section of railway, is Caruso St John’s Newport Street Gallery, which opened its doors to the public in early 2015. As an architectural photographer I was excited to pay a visit since hearing about the inaugural exhibition of work by Sheffield-born abstract painter John Hoyland last year and had been intending to make a trip with my camera to photograph the buildings impressive interior and exterior spaces. The recent exhibition of work by artist Jeff Koons provided such an opportunity.

Architectural Photography of Newport Street Gallery’s Main Entrance.

Architectural Photography of Newport Street Gallery’s Main Entrance.

The gallery is comprised of several former theatre warehouses which have been converted by London architecture studio Caruso St John to house Damien Hirst’s growing collection of contemporary art which consists of some 3000 or so pieces. The 3,400 square-meter gallery, although large, isn't incapable of such a feat, but still provides ample space for individual artist shows. In addition to the exhibition space the building also contains a restaurant called the Pharmacy², which takes Damien Hirst’s iconic Medicine Cabinet installations as its point of reference for both the name and its interior design inspiration. Located at the opposite end of the gallery, in a space separate from the rest of the building, is shop where books and selected works and prints can be purchased.

Contrasting the old and new brickwork along Newport Street Gallery’s facade.

Contrasting the old and new brickwork along Newport Street Gallery’s facade.

In the wake of its opening the building has slowly been picking up a host of prestigious awards, most notably the RIBA 2016 Sterling Prize, along with the RIBA National Award 2016 and RIBA London Award 2016. In addition to this it also picked up the top prize at the Brick Development Association (BDA) Brick Awards for its well considered juxtaposition of old and new brickwork which make up the facade. The exterior architectural photography I took aims to convey this integration of old and new brickwork, showing the irregular transitions and multicoloured surfaces that come together to form the buildings skin.

Interior Photography of Newport Street Gallery Exhibition Space - Artwork by Jeff Koons.

Interior Photography of Newport Street Gallery Exhibition Space - Artwork by Jeff Koons.

The galleries close proximity to the adjacent railway line makes it tricky to photograph the building’s exterior in its entirety which is unfortunate for the changes in brickwork and external details can only truly be appreciated in contrast to one another. The interiors spaces are bright and spacious as would be expected of a modern gallery with high ceilings so as to accommodate large sculptures and other installations - Jeff Koons’s giant stainless steel sculpture of a balloon-shaped dog currently occupying one of the spaces is testament to this.

Newport Street Gallery - Photography: Copyright © Alex Upton

Newport Street Gallery - Photography: Copyright © Alex Upton

One of the nicest architectural features inside the gallery are the spiral staircases which provide access to the galleries second floor of exhibition spaces. The stairs themselves are surrounded by a white engineered brick which follows their curvature all the way to the top of the building. 

Newport Street Gallery - Photography: Copyright © Alex Upton

Newport Street Gallery - Photography: Copyright © Alex Upton

Newport Street Gallery is an incredibly successful piece of architecture, it manages to be subtle yet captivating, the more elaborate and expressive parts of the building are restricted to the stairwells and exterior while the artworks are allowed to take centre stage in the exhibition spaces. This careful balance of creating a beautifully detailed building which fails to overshadow the artwork is quite an achievement and something which is often neglected in many new-build art galleries. Here artwork and architecture exist in harmony, so whether you are going to appreciate the artwork, architecture or both, you will no doubt be impressed by at least one of them. To see more of my architectural photographs of Newport Street Gallery please head over to the projects section of my portfolio.

Tate Modern Switch House by Herzog & de Meuron by Alex Upton

Photographs of Tate Modern Switch House - Copyright © Alex Upton

Development: Tate Modern Switch House - Gallery Extension
Architects: Herzog and de Meuron
Location: Southbank, London
Height: 72m

Tate Modern Switch House - Photography: Copyright © Alex Upton

Architects Herzog & de Meuron's extension to the Tate Modern gallery is now nearing completion and is due to open to the public on  17th June 2016. Named the Switch House, since it is situated of the site of the former electrical substation, the new building will house galleries across 10 floors expanding the Tate Modern's exhibition space to accommodate their ever increasing collection of international art acquisitions. 

Tate Modern Switch House - Photography: Copyright © Alex Upton

Having followed the buildings construction progress over the past several years I have long been anticipating the day when the brick-clad structure would finally be revealed, for it has lain hidden beneath the incredibly complex and somewhat beautiful lattice of scaffolding for a considerable amount of time. With that now removed and the crane no longer on site I optimistically ventured down to South Bank on a somewhat cloudy and rainy day, just as I arrived the heavens parted and I was fortunate enough to get some photographs of the external structure in its afternoon glory.

Tate Modern Switch House - Photography: Copyright © Alex Upton

The building is clad in 336,000 perforated lattice bricks which are not only beautiful to admire for the complexity of their combined structure, but also because they allow light and shadows to permeate through the buildings external skin, this is especially noticeable once the internal lights are switched on in the evening.

Tate Modern Switch House - Photography: Copyright © Alex Upton

Its almost hard to know when to stop photographing this building for it formal and surface qualities offer endless opportunities for different compositions, with each revealing something new about the structure. Hopefully next time I return to the site I will take a zoom lens to focus in on the architectural details and brick work. I also look forward to experiencing the artworks on display inside, but i fear they will be dominated by the beauty of their container.

Tate Modern Switch House - Photography: Copyright © Alex Upton

Currently there is still landscaping ongoing at the base of the building which will no doubt open up the area adjacent to Richard Roger's NEO Bankside apartments. I will update more images once the building finally reveals itself later next month. You can find more of my Tate Modern Switch House Photographs under the projects section of my portfolio.  

Tate Modern Switch House - Photography: Copyright © Alex Upton